Evaluating Education Information Systems: Implementation of Longitudinal Student Data Systems in Six School Districts

  • Rebecca Hinze-Pifer
  • Daniel S. Ramsey
Keywords: education policy, information systems, education reform, school districts, performance data

Abstract

Education reformers are currently spending significant resources and effort advocating for school districts to adopt integrated, longitudinal computer systems. They hope the systems will help teachers understand their students as well as adapt their teaching methods. Additionally, they argue higher-quality data will help administrators and policymakers determine if schools are successful. This paper describes the experiences of six districts as they adopted education information systems, discusses emergent themes based on their cases, and explores implications for policymakers and school leaders.

Author Biographies

Rebecca Hinze-Pifer
Rebecca Hinze-Pifer is a second year Master of Public Policy student at The George Washington University concentrating in education policy, and will be starting a doctoral program in the fall. Rebecca has worked at the Pew Research Centers and was a public school teacher for seven years. She earned her BA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Daniel S. Ramsey
Daniel S. Ramsey is a second year Master of Public Policy student at The George Washington University concentrating in budgeting and public finance and education policy. Daniel has worked in institutional research and assessment at California State University, Fullerton, The George Washington University, and at the US Government Accountability Office. He earned his BA from California State University, Fullerton.
Published
2011-10-18
Section
Articles